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Biomass agro-residue resource availability in Andhra Pradesh

This state wide biomass resource assessment updation was undertaken by Deloitte as part of “Review of Performance of the Grid Connected Biomass Based Power Plants Installed in South India” study undertaken under MNRE-UNDP/GEF project on “Removal of barriers to biomass power generation in India” in 2009. Biomass power potential in the target state of Andhra Pradesh was re-assessed by updating the agro-residue production in the state by using the most recent agriculture crop production data, taken from Directorate of Agriculture, Andhra Pradesh, for the year 2007-08 available at the time of study. Crop to agriculture residue production ratios used in the study were taken from Biomass Resource Atlas prepared by IISc, Bangalore.


Agriculture production in Andhra Pradesh

The major agro-residues of Andhra Pradesh are rice husk, maize stalks and maize cobs, which accounts for almost 2/3rd of biomass available in the state. Other biomass agro-residues which are available include groundnut shells, cotton stalks, coconut frond, bengal gram stalks, sunflower stalks, jowar stalks-cobs and ragi stalks. Table 1 presents the surplus biomass available from these agro residues and power potential. With geographical area of about 27.5 million hectares, the average agro residue density and biomass power density of the state works out to about 0.19 ton/ha and 0.24 MW/sq.km. The study also estimated the district-wise agro-residue resource and corresponding power generation potential, which is presented in Table 2.


Agro-residue availability and power potential in Andhra Pradesh*

Agro-residue type

Surplus biomass
('000 tonnes)

Power Potential (MW)

Paddy husk

2,131.8

234.5

Maize stalks

827.0

107.5

Maize cobs

744.3

104.2

Groundnut shell

546.8

65.6

Cotton stalks

430.9

56.0

Coconut frond

250.7

32.6

Bengal gram stalks

100.3

13.0

Sunflower stalks

83.0

10.8

Jowar stalks

80.1

10.4

Jowar cobs

47.1

6.6

RG stalks

39.3

5.1

BG stalks

30.0

3.9

Total

5,311.3

650.3

Biomass density (ton/ha)

 

0.19

Power density (MW/sq km)

 

0.24

* The study was conducted in year 2009, when Telangana was part of unified Andhra Pradesh.



Surplus biomass and power potential

District

Surplus biomass ('000 tonnes)

Agro-residue density (ton/ha)

Power potential (MW)

Power density (MW/sq.km.)

Districts which are part of present Andhra Pradesh

Anantapur

356.1

0.19

11.3

0.17

Chittoor

101.7

0.07

12.1

0.08

Cuddapah

160.9

0.10

15.6

0.09

East Godavri

368.1

0.34

33.4

0.38

Guntur

287.7

0.33

43.1

0.40

Krishna

439.4

0.39

54.7

0.48

Kurnool

95.9

0.15

45.4

0.25

Nellore

309.4

0.16

37.6

0.20

Prakasam

125.2

0.08

15.0

0.10

Srikakulum

174.3

0.30

20.6

0.35

Visakhapatnam

60.8

0.05

7.3

0.07

Vizianagaram

303.5

0.17

17.0

0.13

West Godavari

407.6

0.53

48.2

0.62

Districts which are part of Telangana State

Adilabad

131.6

0.08

20.7

0.13

Karimnagar

558.7

0.47

71.0

0.60

Khammam

209.6

0.13

25.8

0.16

Mahbubnagar

213.0

0.15

24.5

0.17

Medak

248.1

0.26

32.2

0.33

Nizambad

225.8

0.28

28.5

0.36

Nalgonda

152.2

0.12

37.9

0.21

Rangareddy

83.9

0.11

10.9

0.15

Warangal

297.8

0.23

37.4

0.29

Total for then Unified Andhra Pradesh

5,311.3

0.19

650.3

0.24

The study estimated that total surplus biomass agro-residue availability for unified Andhra Pradesh was 5.31 million tonnes with a power production potential of 650 MW. However, the study also emphasised the unbalanced distribution of biomass power plants with concentration of large number of plants in pockets of small geographical area resulting in severe shortage of biomass. It was observed that there were more number of power plants in Krishna and Guntur districts but still there were no plants in Karimnagar and Warangal districts (at the time of study) despite higher surplus biomass density (0.47 and 0.23 ton/ha respectively). At the same time, Prakasam district with low agro-residue density of 0.08 ton/ha had highest installed capacity of 34.5 MW in the state, resulting in drawing biomass from adjoining districts of Guntur, which already had many biomass power plants installations. The study also mentioned that shortage of biomass resource is also faced in the state was due to other competitive biomass usages such as replacing petroleum fuels in industries such as distilleries, agro-processing, etc., which offers higher opportunity price.


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Last updated on: May 20, 2016